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Estate administration: When one executor lives abroad

Having an estate plan is vitally important for all adults regardless of their circumstances. In fashioning an estate plan, British Columbia residents must keep in mind who will be involved in estate administration once the time comes and there are a few things to think about when choosing an executor -- especially if the executor doesn't live in the country. For example, if a parent names two children as executors and one lives abroad, there may be some hurdles to overcome, but it could work.

Estate administration and estate planning for common law couples

Some couples may have lived together for years, yet choose to remain unmarried. Things are different today than they were decades ago and it has become socially acceptable for couples to live in common law unions. But some things still aren't so easy for such couples and one of them involves estate planning so that estate administration in British Columbia can be as seamless as possible when the time comes.

Estate adminstration: RRSPs and RRIFs of a decedent

Taxes are something about which most adults are concerned. It's no different when it comes to estate planning. An individual who has been tasked with estate administration duties in British Columbia needs to have some knowledge of how RRSPs and RRIFs are taxed after a person's death. The values of both are usually included in the amount of assets of the deceased person and subject to taxation, but it's not always that simple.

Estate administration for single British Columbia residents

Everyone needs estate planning documents. Single British Columbia residents should also have wills and other estate planning documents, but when it comes to choosing an individual for estate administration duties, a single person without children may wonder who to choose for that task. When other family members are too busy with their own lives to take on the task, a single person does have other options.

Estate administration: Dealing with an insolvent estate

Being named as a beneficiary of some estates may not exactly be a windfall. During the estate administration process it may be found that some British Columbia estates are actually insolvent. In other words, they have more debts associated with them than assets and that can pose problems for beneficiaries and executors who should be aware of what to do and what not to do in such cases.

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