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Estate Administration & Probate Archives

Estate administration: Keeping the wealth in the family

People work hard for their money. Having a family's wealth protected from unforeseen events like divorce will likely ensure that when the time comes for estate administration in British Columbia, there won't be issues connected with a divorce. The last thing prosperous Canadians want is for the money they've worked so hard for to end up going to those who they wouldn't want it to go to and that sometimes means to a divorced adult child's former spouse or common law partner.

Estate administration: Keeping the peace among family members

One of the issues in the back of most people's minds when they think about planning their estates is how to keep everyone happy. That goal may be much easier to attain and estate administration much simpler when British Columbia residents put into place some pertinent things in place when writing their plans. One of those includes choosing the right executor to administer the will.  

Estate administration: Options for solo seniors

Unmarried seniors who have no children or extended family members may have an issue when it comes to their estates. If these British Columbia residents don't have family, who then will look after their estate administration when it's a job usually relegated to adult children or some other family member? Naming a corporate executor is a viable option in these cases.

Estate administation: The public guardian and trustee's role

Where there is a will, there is a way. And when the person named in a will to be the executor cannot take on the task of estate administration in British Columbia (nor can an intestate successor or beneficiary or any other person), the province may step in and appoint a public guardian and trustee (PGT) who may do so. This individual would follow the directives in the will.

Estate administration: Clearance certificates

Those who have been called to administer the estate of a deceased person should know about clearance certificates. Estate administration in British Columbia means the executor or trustee has been given the duties of making sure certain things take place like the payment of taxes, paying debts and ensuring beneficiaries receive their inheritances. A clearance certificate actually paves the way for an estate administrator to distribute the assets without personal responsibility for any accounts the deceased, trust, estate or corporation may owe to the government.

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