Garton & Harris
Blog

Estate Administration & Probate Archives

Estate administration without help could be a daunting prospect

The time immediately after a loved one's death is a time for grieving. However, if you were appointed to handle the estate administration, you might have to suppress emotions and tackle this detailed, time-consuming process, which many people might find overwhelming. Fortunately, the lawyers at the British Columbia law firm of Garton & Harris can provide the necessary support and guidance to make sure you meet every legal duty.

The importance of talking to loved ones about an estate plan

Talking with family members about death is not an easy prospect. However, doing so can significantly limit future surprises, especially regarding an estate plan that contains important information about the last wishes of their loved one. Having that difficult discussion may actually show loved ones their welfare is paramount.

What loved ones can do when omitted from wills

When British Columbia residents are omitted from the will of a loved one, it can cause many emotions to surface, such as sadness and anger. Once they have come to terms with what has happened, they might be able to think more logically and then realize there are some things they may be able to do to remedy the issue. In fact, wills have been the reason for many litigation cases in the last few years. 

The role of an executor in estate administration

There are many terms associated with wills. Those who are involved in any form of estate planning and administration will have likely come across the term executor. So what, exactly, does an executor do? A person named as an executor of an estate wears many hats. 

Tax rules governing gifts, inheritances and estate administration

There is an old adage that says there are two certainties in life -- death and taxes. When it comes to estate administration in Canada, those two things play a large part as well, death for obvious reasons and taxes because inheritances and gifts, in some cases, may be considered taxable. There is no inheritance tax in Canada per se, but there are still some taxes that will affect the deceased person's estate and his or her beneficiaries.

Schedule An Appointment With Us

Send Us An E-mail
Scroll To Top